Wednesday, October 19, 2016

about my wooden mallets



Making wooden mallets are one of my weird interests :) Here I'll show you how I made each of them.



The first ever one I made is the round carver's mallet from ShopNote, The head is laminated with Maple and Ash, the grain is crossed, so the face of the head get a even distribution of end grain.







I resawed the slice on my homemade bandsaw, it's my first time making mallets, so I'm not sure what size I should go. I actually had way too much layers, had to cut about 1/3 off to make it more balanced.




Handle is turned on a lathe, at this point, I only used the lathe a handful times, still learning the basics. I basically use scraper the most, and followed with a lot of sanding.







To turn the head, I first trimmed as much as possible on a table saw, and also use a scraper to turn it. It has cross grains so more like bowl turning. With different diameter and roughness of the shape, you have to constantly change the speed, my little Harbor freight lathe is really awkward to change speed, but other than that, the little cheap lathe worked great.


Drill out the hole for the handle, than glued in handle with wedge.







A little sanding and 2 coats of wipe-on. I noticed the mallet is way too big right away, so I cut about 1/3 off from the head to make it balance.








The second one is also from Shopnote, it's a more heavier mallet. The alternate color from darker Walnut and lighter Ash is really lovely. I laminated the head in the way that the face of the head is all end grain, that makes it much tougher.


I started by resaw the piece for the head.


The handle is bandsaw cut then hand shaped.






I first laminated the core of the head, left 2 of the most outer piece out. So I can add some weight and use the outer piece to hide that.


Glue on the outer piece to hide the weight.


Glue the handle in with wedges.

Sand to smooth.




Two coats of wipe-on, and it's done.

This is one of my most used mallet, I really beat on it. The glued lamination holds up really well.







I needed a smaller/lighter mallet for some delicate work, I found this design online and really liked it.
It's super simple, everything was turned on the lathe, both face and handle had one side snug fit in the Brass Tee fitting. The weight is just right and looks beautiful.



I also wanted a mallet for assembly, it needs a soft head so it won't scratch the surface of the finish. So I made another one :)




I like the laminated look, and want to try out baltic birch as the head. Here are all the wood I need.




I added some lead shots in the head to increase the weight. I fill it on 70-80% up, so it has a damping effect, when you hit something, it doesn't bounce back as hard.



Handle is a piece of scrape white oak, partially turned on the lathe, than sanded smooth.




You need a mallet to make a mallet :)

Glue on a piece of leather on the face, and it's done.
















My daughter also demand that she also needed a mallet. so I made a small one for her :)

Tape holder

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